Often, being successful in the precast concrete industry is as much about being proactive as it is about manufacturing a quality product. Steve Domizio, partner at Connecticut Precast Corp. in Monroe, Conn., knows this all too well. With a little initiative, Domizio discovered that a local landfill project up for bid sought a 42,000-pound wingwall. The catch? The original specification called for a cast-in-place solution. Recognizing that CPC’s precast could get the job done, Domizio and his team proposed their precast alternative. According to Domizio, CPC submitted a typical detail for the precast wingwall, but it was refused because it didn’t exactly match the plans. So, the CPC team went back to the drawing board and submitted a new, more precise detail and won the job. CPC partnered with general contractor AMEC Construction of Norwalk, Conn., to complete the work. Domizio said precast provided several advantages to the project. “It’s a busy site, and like most companies, AMEC is about production,” he explained. “Cast-in-place would have required AMEC to move resources from another job to form and pour the wingwalls, so precast made sense.”The massive wingwall is the largest that CPC has ever manufactured, and was produced in three sections so AMEC could lift and position it into place. In addition to the wingwall, CPC manufactured a variety of precast concrete manholes and catch basins for the project. Had CPC chosen to accept the original spec and simply moved on, none of the work would have been possible.

Often, being successful in the precast concrete industry is as much about being proactive as it is about manufacturing a quality product. Steve Domizio, partner at Connecticut Precast Corp. in Monroe, Conn., knows this all too well.
With a little initiative, Domizio discovered that a local landfill project up for bid sought a 42,000-pound wingwall. The catch? The original specification called for a cast-in-place solution. Recognizing that CPC’s precast could get the job done, Domizio and his team proposed their precast alternative.
According to Domizio, CPC submitted a typical detail for the precast wingwall, but it was refused because it didn’t exactly match the plans. So, the CPC team went back to the drawing board and submitted a new, more precise detail and won the job.
CPC partnered with general contractor AMEC Construction of Norwalk, Conn., to complete the work. Domizio said precast provided several advantages to the project.
“It’s a busy site, and like most companies, AMEC is about production,” he explained. “Cast-in-place would have required AMEC to move resources from another job to form and pour the wingwalls, so precast made sense.”

The massive wingwall is the largest that CPC has ever manufactured, and was produced in three sections so AMEC could lift and position it into place.
In addition to the wingwall, CPC manufactured a variety of precast concrete manholes and catch basins for the project. Had CPC chosen to accept the original spec and simply moved on, none of the work would have been possible.

Connecticut Precast Concrete Wingwall

Often, being successful in the precast concrete industry is as much about being proactive as it is about manufacturing a quality product. Steve Domizio, partner at Connecticut Precast Corp. in Monroe, Conn., knows this all too well.

With a little initiative, Domizio discovered that a local landfill project up for bid sought a 42,000-pound wingwall. The catch? The original specification called for a cast-in-place solution. Recognizing that CPC’s precast could get the job done, Domizio and his team proposed their precast alternative.

According to Domizio, CPC submitted a typical detail for the precast wingwall, but it was refused because it didn’t exactly match the plans. So, the CPC team went back to the drawing board and submitted a new, more precise detail and won the job.

CPC partnered with general contractor AMEC Construction of Norwalk, Conn., to complete the work. Domizio said precast provided several advantages to the project.

“It’s a busy site, and like most companies, AMEC is about production,” he explained. “Cast-in-place would have required AMEC to move resources from another job to form and pour the wingwalls, so precast made sense.”

Connecticut Precast Concrete Products

The massive wingwall is the largest that CPC has ever manufactured, and was produced in three sections so AMEC could lift and position it into place.

In addition to the wingwall, CPC manufactured a variety of precast concrete manholes and catch basins for the project. Had CPC chosen to accept the original spec and simply moved on, none of the work would have been possible.

Kaynak:https://precast.org/2015/06/spec-change-cip-to-precast/

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